Rabbit Care

Preparing for Surgery

Surgical Details

Post-Op Care

General Rabbit Care

Rabbit Resources

Post Surgical Care Instructions

Meloxicam is sent home with your rabbit after surgery. It is an anti-inflammatory medication, which will help relieve pain and discomfort. 

The first dose is due the morning after surgery. 

Clean your rabbit's cage daily, preferably twice a day, of urine and feces to minimize contamination/infection. It is important to keep your rabbit warm, clean, and dry. Your rabbit should be defecating and urinating within 24 hours. 

Rabbits are very sensitive to pain and often stop eating which can lead to a potentially fatal condition called ileus. Even if your rabbit doesn't seem painful, please give the pain medication as directed to avoid this situation.

Ileus - a painful obstruction of the ileum or other part of the intestine.

It is very important that your rabbit begins eating and drinking soon after surgery. We offer the hay/pellets you provided for their visit,  once they are recovered enough to eat. At home, your rabbit should be eating the same day as surgery. 

If your rabbit has not eaten by the morning after surgery, you MUST force feed your rabbit! Critical Care should be given if your rabbit is not eating. If you are not able to get Critical Care immediately, you can use the directions below to make a gruel until you can get access to Critical Care. 

Gruel Solution

  1. Dilute food in pellets with water and draw up with a feeling syringe

  2. Give 5 ML every four (4) hours or 10 ML every eight (8) hours 

  3. Appetite will increase slowly. It should be back to normal within a couple days. Please consult a veterinarian to ensure your pet is improving as needed. 

More Tips to Increase Eating & Proper Recovery:

  • Sprinkle hay all over the cage - no matter where they are, there will be a food source and the smell of hay.

  • Offer parsley, romaine lettuce, apples, banana, & carrots. NEVER feed a rabbit iceberg lettuce.

  • Offer a bowl of water, as well as a bottle - this will help increase water intake and encourage eating. 

Your rabbit should be urinating and defecating within 24 hours of surgery. 

Exercise should be limited for a week. Some exercise is good for recovery, but NO running or jumping on/off of objects or furniture. 

DO NOT allow excessive licking at the incision. 

          Please note: the suture material is absorbable. It is buried and will dissolve. 

Watch the incision for swelling, redness, or drainage. Apply NOTHING to the incision. If you do notice any of these changes, immediately contact your veterinarian. 

Additional Resources

if a recheck is needed, call 

Pineview Veterinary Clinic

(608) 850-7387

If Emergency Care is needed, contact:

Veterinary Emergency

Service East 

(608) 222-2455

UW Veterinary Care

(608) 263-7600

for a list of recommended vets in your area, contact

House Rabbit Society 

(608) 232-7044

Rabbit Care

**Please note - we are not currently scheduling Rabbit spays or neuters at this time. 

For more resources, check out the House Rabbit Society's webpage HERE. 

Post Surgical Care Instructions

Meloxicam is sent home with your rabbit after surgery. It is an anti-inflammatory medication, which will help relieve pain and discomfort. 

The first dose is due the morning after surgery. 

Clean your rabbit's cage daily, preferably twice a day, of urine and feces to minimize contamination/infection. It is important to keep your rabbit warm, clean, and dry. Your rabbit should be defecating and urinating within 24 hours. 

Rabbits are very sensitive to pain and often stop eating which can lead to a potentially fatal condition called ileus. Even if your rabbit doesn't seem painful, please give the pain medication as directed to avoid this situation.

Ileus - a painful obstruction of the ileum or other part of the intestine.

It is very important that your rabbit begins eating and drinking soon after surgery. We offer the hay/pellets you provided for their visit,  once they are recovered enough to eat. At home, your rabbit should be eating the same day as surgery. 

If your rabbit has not eaten by the morning after surgery, you MUST force feed your rabbit! Critical Care should be given if your rabbit is not eating. If you are not able to get Critical Care immediately, you can use the directions below to make a gruel until you can get access to Critical Care. 

Gruel Solution

  1. Dilute food in pellets with water and draw up with a feeling syringe

  2. Give 5 ML every four (4) hours or 10 ML every eight (8) hours 

  3. Appetite will increase slowly. It should be back to normal within a couple days. Please consult a veterinarian to ensure your pet is improving as needed. 

More Tips to Increase Eating & Proper Recovery:

  • Sprinkle hay all over the cage - no matter where they are, there will be a food source and the smell of hay.

  • Offer parsley, romaine lettuce, apples, banana, & carrots. NEVER feed a rabbit iceberg lettuce.

  • Offer a bowl of water, as well as a bottle - this will help increase water intake and encourage eating. 

Your rabbit should be urinating and defecating within 24 hours of surgery. 

Exercise should be limited for a week. Some exercise is good for recovery, but NO running or jumping on/off of objects or furniture. 

DO NOT allow excessive licking at the incision. 

          Please note: the suture material is absorbable. It is buried and will dissolve. 

Watch the incision for swelling, redness, or drainage. Apply NOTHING to the incision. If you do notice any of these changes, immediately contact your veterinarian. 

Additional Resources

if a recheck is needed, call 

Pineview Veterinary Clinic

(608) 850-7387

If Emergency Care is needed, contact:

Veterinary Emergency

Service East 

(608) 222-2455

UW Veterinary Care

(608) 263-7600

for a list of recommended vets in your area, contact

House Rabbit Society 

(608) 232-7044

SPAY ME! IS A PROGRAM OF SHELTER FROM THE STORM ANIMAL RESCUE, INC.

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